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For the State of Florida Hurricane Recovery Information, please visit www.floridadisaster.org

IMPORTANT 2014 HURRICANE SEASON INFORMATION

NATIONAL HURRICANE
CENTER

National Weather Service

Levy Co. Storm Surge
Tide Poles in
Cedar Key, Yankeetown & Inglis


Got A Plan? Got A  List?

Emergency Notification System:
Click here to learn more

Emergency Notification

Click here to sign up

Levy County Clerk's Office
Levy County Tax Collector
Levy County Library System
Levy County Property Appraiser
Levy County
Levy County Sheriff's Office
Levy County Supervisor of Elections
The Eighth Judicial Circuit Courts
Division of Forestry
Keetch Byram Drought Index


Levy County School Board
Shelter Info

Pet Shelter Info


From the Levy County School Board Shelter - A Guide for Citizens Seeking Shelter in Levy County Schools


LMS Plan

County Emergency Management Plan


Quick Site Links
"GET A PLAN"
REGISTER FOR SPECIAL NEEDS HERE
SurgeZones
Evacuation Zones
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Surge Zones
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During an emergency, you may hear rumors. Please don't accept rumor as fact. Special telephone hotlines will provide the latest official information. However, use telephones only when absolutely necessary so telephone circuits will remain clear for emergency workers.
Levy County
(352)486-5155
after hours -
(352)486-5111
or(352)486-5576

Citrus County
(352)746-6555
after hours - 911
Citizen Information Line
(352)746-5470
or(352)527-2106

State of Florida

1-800-342-3557
 
Local Emergency Alert System
(EAS) Stations
WXCV - 95.3
WXOF - 96.3
WSKY - 97.3
WKTK - 98.5
WTRS - 102.3
WRGO - 102.7
WRUF - 103.7
WIFL - 104.3
WRZN - 720AM
WUFT-TV - Ch. 5
WFLA-TV - Ch. 8
WTSP-TV - Ch. 10
WTVT-TV - Ch. 13
WCJB-TV - Ch. 20
WFTS-TV - Ch. 28
WTOG-TV - Ch. 44
Adelphia Cable
Brighthouse Cable
NOAA Radio - 162.400 Mhz

More
Levy County Emergency Management, located in the Emergency Operations Center in Bronson, Fl, is the "Direction and Control Center" for Levy County in times of disaster.
Threat Level

Levy County Emergency
Management current
activation level. For more info CLICK HERE

Activation Level
   
2015 Storm Names
Ana,  Bill,  Claudette,  Danny,  Erika,  Fred,  Grace,  Henri,  Ida,  Joaquin,  Kate,  Larry,  Mindy,  Nicholas,  Odette,  Peter,  Rose,  Sam,  Teresa,  Victor,  Wanda
Welcome
Levy County Emergency Management hopes this website provides the citizens of Levy County with the proper information that is needed to make informed decisions and preparations regarding your disaster preparedness plans for the Hurricane season.

During a storm event, it is our goal to provide the latest emergency information available regarding protective action decisions and safety information.

Our normal office hours are Monday - Friday 8 am to 5 pm. If you have any questions or comments regarding disaster planning for yourself, your family, your home or business, please contact Levy County Emergency Management at 352-486-5213.
For non-emergency inquiries after normal business hours or on weekends, please call the Levy County Sheriff's Office at 352-486-5111.

To report EMERGENCIES during after hours and weekends contact the Levy County Sheriff's Office emergency 911 phone number.

Also keep an eye on our Current Events section which will give you upcoming event and course locations.


Thank you and we hope you find our website useful.
LEVY COUNTY FLOODED WELL BOILED WATER AND DISINFECT NOTICE AND PROCEDURES
For Immediate Release Contact: Levy County
August 3, 2015 Health Department
ESF 8 Levy County Emergency Management 352-486-5300

FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH IN LEVY COUNTY REMINDS RESIDENTS OF DANGERS ASSOCIATED WITH FLOODED PRIVATE WELLS

Levy County, Florida – Recent heavy rains may have impacted your private well and made your water unsafe. If your well casing has been submerged by flood water, either use bottled water, or boil or disinfect all the water you use for drinking, making beverages, cooking, brushing your teeth, washing dishes, and washing areas of the skin that have been cut or injured.

Common unscented household bleach (4 to 6%) can be used effectively as a chlorine disinfectant. Add 8 drops (about 1/8 teaspoon) of unscented household bleach per gallon of water, then let stand for 30 minutes, repeating the procedure if the water is still cloudy. An alternative disinfecting method involves bringing water to a rolling boil for one minute.

If your well has been flooded, please call the Levy County Health Department for information on how to sample your water and where to bring the sample for bacteriological testing. If the test reveals bacteria, the well and water system need to be disinfected.

It is important to disinfect both well and plumbing water with unscented household bleach to ensure that all infectious agents are destroyed. If you have water treatment devices, remove all membranes, cartridges, and filters and replace them after the chlorination process is completed. The amount of chlorine determines the length of time you allow the bleach to remain in your system.

DOH recommends the following steps to disinfect a contaminated well:

• If the water is discolored before adding the bleach, run the water until it is clear for up to 10 minutes.
• Turn off and then drain your hot water heater— bleach is not effective in water above 105 degrees.
• Remove and replace charcoal filters after the disinfecting process is completed.
• To avoid adding contamination to the well during disinfection, clean the work area around the top of the well. Then remove grease and mineral deposits from accessible parts of the well head and flush the outside surfaces with 1/2 cup of unscented household bleach in 5 gallons of water.
• Turn off the pump. Remove the cap or the well plug on the rubber seal. There are many types of well caps and plugs. If you have questions, you should contact a licensed well driller. If you have a submersible pump, you may also want to contact a licensed well driller for advice on disinfection procedures.

--more—

Flooded Well/Page 2


• Consult the bleach chart and pour the recommended amount of unscented bleach (4 to 6%) solution into the well. Try to coat the sides of the casing as you pour. If you get bleach on the pump or wiring, flush it thoroughly with fresh water to prevent later corrosion.

BLEACH CHART

Well Depth in Feet Well Diameter in Inches
2” 4” 5” 6”
Amount of Bleach to Use
20’ 1 cup 1 cup 1 cup 1 cup
30’ 1 cup 1 cup 1 cup 2 cups
40’ 1 cup 1 cup 2 cups 2 cups
50’ 1 cup 2 cups 2 cups 3 cups
80’ 1 cup 2 cups 1 qt 1 qt
100’ 1 cup 3 cups 1 qt 1.5 qts
150’ 2 cups 1 qt 2 qts 2.5 qts
200’ 3 cups 1.5 qts 2.5 qts 3 qts

Conversions 8 oz = 1 cup /16 oz = 1 pint = 2 cups
24 oz = 3 cups / 32 oz = 1 quart / 48 oz = 1.5 quarts
64 oz = 2 quarts / 80 oz = 2.5 quarts / 96 oz = 3 quarts


• Re-cap or plug the well opening and wait 30 minutes.
• Turn on and, if needed, re-prime the pump. Open all of the faucets on the system one at a time. Allow the water to run until there is a noticeable smell of bleach. You may also want to flush the toilets. If you have outside faucets, you may want to direct the water away from sensitive plants. If you cannot detect a bleach odor, repeat the disinfecting process.
• Turn off all of the faucets and allow the bleach to remain in the system for at least eight hours.
• Backwash water softeners, sand filters, and iron removal filters with bleach water.
• Again, open all the faucets and run the water until there is no bleach smell—for up to
15 minutes.

After disinfecting your well, the water needs to be tested to verify that it is safe to drink. Although unscented household bleach is effective against microorganisms, it will not remove chemical contamination that may have gotten into your well. Contact the Levy County Health Department at 352-486-5300 for sampling instructions to get your water tested for chemicals if you are concerned. Chemical sampling fees have not been waived at this time.

For further information, please visit www.doh.state.fl.us or www.FloridaDisaster.org.

The Florida Emergency Information Line: 1-800-342-3557

Public Information Emergency Support Function: 850-921-0384

The mission of the Florida Department of Health is to protect and promote the health of all residents and visitors in the state through organized state and community efforts, including cooperative agreements with counties. For more information about DOH programs, visit www.doh.state.fl.us.
###

Cedar Key ,Yankeetown and Inglis Sandbag Locations
Sand and sandbags are located at the following locations. For Cedar Key residents the location is the lot across from the market.
For Yankeetown residents the Yankeetown Water Plant. For Inglis residents Inglis Municipal Building on Risher Avenue
FLOOD WATCH LEVY COUNTY
FLOOD WATCH
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TAMPA BAY AREA - RUSKIN FL
348 PM EDT SUN AUG 2 2015

...FLOOD WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT FOR COASTAL COUNTIES FROM LEVY
COUNTY SOUTHWARD TO PINELLAS AND HILLSBOROUGH COUNTIES...

.ABUNDANT TROPICAL MOISTURE COMBINED WITH A TROUGH OF LOW
PRESSURE OVER THE REGION WILL SUPPORT WIDESPREAD SHOWERS AND
SCATTERED THUNDERSTORMS ACROSS THE WATCH AREA THROUGH MONDAY.
AREAS OF PERSISTENT AND EXCESSIVE RAINFALL ARE EXPECTED.
SATURATED SOILS AND THE POTENTIAL FOR HEAVY RAINFALL WILL
INCREASE THE RISK OF AREAL AND STREET FLOODING THROUGH MONDAY.

FLZ050-139-142-148-149-151-239-242-248-249-251-032000-
/O.CON.KTBW.FA.A.0005.000000T0000Z-150803T2000Z/
/00000.0.ER.000000T0000Z.000000T0000Z.000000T0000Z.OO/
PINELLAS-COASTAL LEVY-COASTAL CITRUS-COASTAL HERNANDO-
COASTAL PASCO-COASTAL HILLSBOROUGH-INLAND LEVY-INLAND CITRUS-
INLAND HERNANDO-INLAND PASCO-INLAND HILLSBOROUGH-
INCLUDING THE CITIES OF...ST. PETERSBURG...CLEARWATER...LARGO...
CEDAR KEY...YANKEETOWN...CRYSTAL RIVER...HOMOSASSA...
HERNANDO BEACH...BAYPORT...PORT RICHEY...HUDSON...TAMPA...
APOLLO BEACH...WESTCHASE...CHIEFLAND...BRONSON...WILLISTON...
INVERNESS...BROOKSVILLE...SPRING HILL...DADE CITY...ZEPHYRHILLS...
BRANDON...PLANT CITY...SUN CITY CENTER
348 PM EDT SUN AUG 2 2015

...FLOOD WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT THROUGH MONDAY AFTERNOON...

THE FLOOD WATCH CONTINUES FOR

* PORTIONS OF FL AND WEST CENTRAL FLORIDA...INCLUDING THE
FOLLOWING IN FL...COASTAL ...CITRUS...COASTAL HERNANDO...
COASTAL HILLSBOROUGH...COASTAL LEVY...COASTAL PASCO...INLAND
CITRUS...INLAND HERNANDO...INLAND HILLSBOROUGH...INLAND LEVY
AND INLAND PASCO. IN WEST CENTRAL FLORIDA...PINELLAS.

* THROUGH MONDAY AFTERNOON

* THE POTENTIAL FOR EXCESSIVE RAINFALL THROUGH MONDAY WITH
LOCALIZED ACCUMULATION TOTALS EXCEEDING 6 INCHES.

* SATURATED SOILS AND THE POTENTIAL FOR ADDITIONAL HEAVY
RAINFALL THROUGH MONDAY WILL INCREASE THE RISK OF AREAL AND
STREET FLOODING. IF POSSIBLE...CLEAR DRAINAGE SYSTEMS OF ANY
DEBRIS WHICH MAY BECOME CLOGGED IN FLOODING RAINS.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A FLOOD WATCH MEANS THAT FLOODING IS POSSIBLE DURING THE NEXT
24 TO 36 HOURS. RESIDENTS LIVING IN FLOOD PRONE AREAS SHOULD TAKE
ACTION TO PROTECT PROPERTY.

  More Info: National Weather Service
"GET A PLAN" Florida Special Needs Registry - Outreach Campain
This video gives great information about having a plan for those family members and loved ones that have access and functional needs. Visit http://flgetaplan.com/ as part of the Florida Division of Emergency Management for more information.

  More Info: "GET A PLAN" Special Needs Registry
LEVY COUNTY SPECIAL NEEDS PROGRAM
Special Needs Program in Levy County is coordinated by Levy County Emergency Management and administered by the Levy County Health Department during times when disasters impact Levy County and shelters have been open.

The Levy County Special Needs Program is for residents with specific health and medical conditions and those requiring transportation assistance. The program helps to provide assistance in sheltering, evacuation, and transportation for registered residents during times of disasters with the resources available within Levy County.

The registry is a confidential listing of those needing assistance and is updated on an annual basis through contact with the registered residents. Residents with medical needs such as nebulizers, oxygen, feeding tubes, or Alzheimer’s disease are examples of medical criteria that are eligible for the registry.

To register for the Levy County Special Needs Program, click on the link below "REGISTER HERE FOR SPECIAL NEEDS" and create a username and password on the Florida Division of Emergency Management and fill out the questionaire OR come to the the Levy County Emergency Operations Center at 7911 NE 90th Street. Bronson, Fl 32621 (By the Levy County Sheriff Office).
This registration is HIPPA compliant and secured your information is not shared with the public.
For questions relating to special needs please contact: 352-486-5213.

Emergency Management strives to offer sheltering space for residents however it is strongly encouraged to seek shelter with friends and family first.




  More Info: "REGISTER HERE FOR SPECIAL NEEDS"
NOAA WEATHER RADIO PROGRAMMING CODE
The NOAA Weather Radio Programming Code for LEVY County is: 012075
Disaster Prevention

Fire RIsk
Division Of Forestry

  More Info: Wildland Fire Information
  
Historic Storm Surge Reality

In late 2004, The Withlacoochee Regional Planning Council located in Ocala, Fl. serving Levy, Marion, Citrus, Sumter and Hernando Counties completed the WITHLACOOCHEE HURRICANE EVACUATION STUDY. This study was presented to Levy County Emergency Management during last years historic Hurricane season.

One section of the Levy County portion of the study produced a storm surge vulnerability assessment. The following pictures illustrate historical flood level data over the past 100 years for the municipalities of Inglis, Yankeetown, and Cedar Key, Fl. These high water levels are identical to the storm surge levels that destroyed the coastlines and backwater areas in Mississippi and Louisiana.
"Storm Surge" is a MAJOR INGREDIENT of a hurricane. What is a storm surge? Storm surge is water that is pushed toward the shore by the force of the winds swirling around the storm. This advancing surge combines with the normal tides to create the hurricane storm tide, which can increase the mean water level 15 feet or more. Additionally, wind driven waves are superimposed on the storm tide. This rise in water level can cause severe flooding in coastal areas, particularly when the storm tide coincides with the normal high tides and the “spring tides” found along the Levy County Coastline. Because much of the densely populated Atlantic and Gulf Coast coastlines lie less that 10 feet above mean sea level, THE DANGER FROM STORM TIDES IS TREMENDOUS.

The level of surge in a particular area is also determined by the slope of the continental shelf. A shallow slope off the coast will allow a greater surge to inundate coastal communities. Levy County coastline has a very shallow slope leading out to the continental shelf. Communities with a steeper continental shelf will not see as much surge inundation, although large breaking waves can still present major problems. Storm tides, waves, and currents in confined harbors severely damage ships, marinas, and pleasure boats.
Surge Chart
Levy County Storm Surge Boundaries by Storm Category

Tropical Storm - Dark Red
Category 1 - Red
Category 2 - Orange
Category 3 - Yellow
Category 4 - Green
Category 5 - Light Blue

Wave and current action associated with the tide also causes extensive damage. Water weighs approximately 1,700 pounds per cubic yard; extended pounding by frequent waves can demolish any structure not specifically designed to withstand these forces. The currents created by the tide combine with the action of the waves to severely erode beaches and coastal highways. Many buildings withstand hurricane force winds until their foundations, undermined by erosion, are weakened and fail. Storm surge also affects rivers and inland lakes, potentially increasing the area that must be evacuated.

The more intense the storm, and the closer a community is to the right-front quadrant, the larger the area that must be evacuated. The problem is always the uncertainty about how intense the storm will be when it finally makes landfall.

Emergency managers and local officials balance that uncertainty with the human and economic risks to their communities. This is why a rule of thumb for emergency managers is to plan for a storm one category higher than what is forecast. This is a reasonable precaution to help minimize the loss of life from hurricanes.

Having said this, Government can only do so much in helping a population to prepare for a Hurricane. Residents and business must take “ownership” for their own safety by preparing, planning and being ready to execute your emergency plans when the Emergency Management authorities issue protective action decisions.

For help and assistance in preparing your Disaster Evacuation Plans contact Levy County Emergency Management.
 
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